Complaining Gives More To Complain About

 

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Photo by Omar Prestwich on Unsplash

Many people I work alongside complain about life. They complain about work. They complain about what’s happening after work. And before work.

Maybe you work with people like that.

When they’re at work, though, most of their complaints are about work.

Most times I avoid such comments. Or I ignore them. Coworkers I’m friendly with know I make no time for their complaints. So one’s I’m friendly with don’t complain around me.

Since my promotion, I’ve gained credibility in my coworkers’ eyes. Both those I’m friendly with and those I’m not.

Today I approached one coworker I’m not so friendly with. The other day, he talked about a pair of winter work gloves he’s thinking about buying. I’m looking for some too. So I asked him about what he was looking at.

But the conversation jumped from gloves to his recent delivery route experience. He told me about how difficult his route had been. How many apartments he had. How much of a struggle it was delivering in apartments.

I said “You know, if you didn’t talk so much about things going wrong on your route, your route would get easier.”

drop quote route

He gave me a blank look.

I added “I know you don’t understand what I’m saying. That’s because you don’t believe thoughts create reality. You believe reality is independent of your thoughts and beliefs.”

He said, “Ok, tell me how exactly it would happen that if I change my thoughts my routes would get easier.”

I said “I can answer that in complete detail. But because you believe reality is independent of your thoughts and beliefs, the words I would share with you would have no meaning to you.”

“Well you certainly have me pegged correctly,” he sad. “I don’t believe my thoughts can change my reality.”

At that point, I asked him what I have in previous, similar conversations: “Have you tested your beliefs to see if you’re right?”

He said he hadn’t.

Of course he hadn’t. Few have.

Then the conversation got interesting.

“I can tell you one thing that’s probably creating my delivery route experience,” he said with confidence.

“Ok,” I said, smiling. “Tell me.”

“That algorithm,” he said. Our company uses an in-house software that tells drivers where to deliver. We’ve been told that software observes how a driver delivers one day. The next day the software alters that person’s route based on its observances.

The driver continued. “The algorithm is designed to give us the same route we deliver successfully so that we get even more efficient on that route.”

I said my route is always easy, in an easy area, the load is easy to deliver and customers on my route are super-friendly. I also told him I never bring back packages when I’m done and usually get my route done early.

He said “that’s because the algorithm keeps giving you that route because you’re successful at it.”

What the driver didn’t know was there was a flaw in this logic. I pointed it out to him.

“So if the software designs your route based on your successful route the previous delivery cycle,” I asked, “then why do you keep getting sucky routes?”

He paused in thought.

Then said, “because we’re told the software works that way. But I don’t think it really does.”

But that logic didn’t make sense either. “If that’s true,” I said, “then why does the software keep giving me the same route, in the same area with great customers and easy delivery days?”

The point I was making…

something has greater influence over all factors involved in delivering these packages. The algorithm plays a part. But there are the people who pick the packages, label them, and organize them according to other software directions. These people can introduce all kinds of variances changing route characteristics.

Dispatchers sometimes rearrange routes. This rearrangement often changes decisions the algorithm makes.

And yet, with all these variables, I still get the same route. With all the wonderful features I laid out above. There must be something else influencing deliveries.

That creates different delivery experiences for different people. Differences that can’t be attributed to the algorithm.

I know that greater influence is my broader perspective. It responds to my focus. Being positively focused, I draw from All That Is only realities consistent with that.

So my routes are always wonderful, my customers fun and happy and my delivery days easy and fun.

Meanwhile, those complaining about their delivery experiences, get more of that.  Complaining gives more to complain about.

Unbeknownst to my colleague the Universe laid bare its secrets. But he couldn’t see them. They were as clear as the words coming out of his mouth. But he couldn’t hear the logical flaws in his beliefs and thoughts. Flaws pointing right at the secret: You create reality by tuning yourself to specific probable futures matching your thoughts and beliefs. This happens all day every day, in every moment.

• • •

If you complain, you get more to complain about. If you’re happy and care free, life reflects that.

I prefer the latter. So that’s what I pay attention to. And that’s what I get.

The driver talking with me believes his thoughts and beliefs don’t shape his reality. So he gets realities that seem random and chaotic. Randomness and chaos come from beliefs in randomness and chaos.

But such beliefs mask the 100 percent correlation. Correlation that really is causation.

I love how clear reality presents to me Universal Secrets. Sometimes it’s through direct observation, manifestation of a desire I have or a conversation. Each time I’m reminded how awesome life is.

And it’s getting better and better. I love sharing my insights. I know when I do, I move humanity, the world and the universe forward.

It’s what I’m here to do. I’m glad I have such an awesome role to play in the context of All That Is.

 

An addendum: The next day, this same driver came to me. He said “I’m not saying our conversation had anything to do with it, but my day went very smooth yesterday.”

As I have said, results are immediate. Which is why I give my Positively Focused clients a 100 percent money back guarantee.

I never have to return their money though. Because the results always happen. That’s because what I share with my clients and through this blog is 100 percent accurate.

They are the secrets of the Universe. Sharing them fulfills me.

Addendum #2 (Dec 3. 2019) last week, I got dispatched to help a fellow driver with her delivery route. It was a chaotic mess. Something went very wrong in how the route got assembled. That’s why this driver was having such a hard time delivering her packages.

When I returned to the station, I asked, out of curiosity, how a route could get so badly organized. His answer reflected exactly what I’m saying in this post. He told me why and how it could happen. Then, at the end, he said “It’s just a matter of bad luck. That this happens to some drivers.”

I don’t consider it a matter of “luck”. Luck is what people who don’t understand what’s happening behind the scenes use to describe what’s going on. But it’s interesting, right? With all the details organizing routes, in the end, “luck” plays a big part. The question is then, how do you get luck on your side?

 

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