Why Manifesting Great Results Means Going Slow

Photo by Vu Thu Giang on Unsplash

Why do some things seem impossible, daunting and unfeasible? Are they really? To understand why nothing is impossible, daunting or unfeasible, one must know how thoughts become things.

Peter Gabriel, an English musician, singer, songwriter, record producer and activist gets it. He penned a song called “Mercy Street“. Its first two versus give clues:

Looking down on empty streets, all she can see
Are the dreams all made solid
Are the dreams made real

All of the buildings, all of the cars
Were once just a dream
In somebody’s head

In this post I’ll introduce one aspect of that knowing of how thoughts become things: The nature of time. In part two, I’ll use something I’m creating that some people think is impossible as a model illustrating how thoughts turn to things and nothing is impossible.

It’s important first knowing that all experience is subjective. No two points of consciousness share the same experience, even when two people focus on what they may think is the same thing. In this way, each human creates their unique experience. Time participates in shaping each experience.

Time to know time

“Time” is an important component in thoughts turning to things. If a person wants to deliberately create their reality, they must grok time as a cooperative element.

It’s obvious most people don’t understand time. Look around. Impatience, haste, deadlines and other artifacts of our socio-economic system show how humans push against and fight against time. If they knew what time was, their impatience, haste and eagerness to beat time would vanish.

Understanding time allows a person great freedom and flexibility. That’s because in understanding it, a person finds more joy in life. Such joy eludes those moving through the world using the social construct known as time.

The social construct that is time works against people’s ability to express their natural creative abilities. (Photo by Djim Loic on Unsplash)

So what is time? It is an interpretation springing from a human point of consciousness. As that consciousness considers “what is” becoming something else, natural time happens. Natural time is that interval between “what is” and the something else it becomes. This time is not the same time people most commonly think about.

Nearly every human does this “considering” thing. So everyone thinks everyone else shares the experience they experience. But each person’s experience is unique. Nothing gets shared. Including the interval called time.

This natural time, the interval, has nothing to do with clocks.

Time created in insecurity

The social construct we call time is something domineering humans put in place to regulate how people get things done. Look back at history and what happened when domineering cultures met other cultures still connected with natural processes.

Those domineering cultures often got impatient and angry when those other cultures operated on the natural knowing of time. So those domineering cultures, in their collective insecurity and frustration, forced other cultures to disconnect from what they knew.

Thus we have “monochronic” time. In it, people get things done in a coordinated way, using time increments segmented into small precise units. This coordinated time is called “clock time” (by Eckart Tolle) or “assembly line time” (by Seth). This kind of time is the common, agreed-upon phenomenon through which everyone coordinates their activity all around the world.

But that time is based on insecurity, born of disconnection. It’s why westerners were once highly frustrated with Mexicans, Native Americans or Australian Aboriginals. When such people met, they gathered on natural or polychronic time. They met when moved. This often infuriated insecure westerners impatient to “get things done”. Fury, anger and impatience indicate powerlessness and insecurity.

Variable speed polychronic time

Polychronic time gets closer to the interval that is natural time. Again, this interval happens while a current manifested thing changes into something else. The word “time” doesn’t accurately capture the experience though because the word “time” implies something fixed and linear. “Fixed” and “linear” are attributes of clock time, not natural time. That’s why “interval” fits better.

Clock time possesses three other attributes: apparent past, present and future. Each flows from one to the other. The interval between manifestation, however, is highly flexible, nonlinear, and all happening in the now. One thing turning into another can happen in an instant. Or it can take eons. And since it’s all happening now, past, present and future don’t exist. Clock time creates past, present and future. Natural time is now, now, now.

While you may not have experienced past, present and future as happening at once, I’m certain your experience includes witnessing time’s flexibility. Natural time also enjoys variable speeds at which it passes. How long or short natural time’s interval lasts, depends on the consciousness experiencing it.

How “fast” time passes depends on one’s resistance about what is becoming. With little resistance, one manifestation turns into another quickly. With high resistance, manifestations might never happen. The interval can stretch into forever. Or pass so fast, you’re surprised it’s happened so quickly.

Time, natural time, expands or contracts depending on the consciousness experiencing it. (Photo by Mathew Schwartz on Unsplash)

Instantaneous time happens

Natural time exists in infinitesimal quantities in the place from which we come. I call that place “nonphysical”. Everything happens there instantly. That’s because resistance in that place is so low, it’s not worth considering.

You’ve already experienced how time can fly by or crawl. Your state of being shapes the interval. Absorbed in an activity, the interval contracts. When bored out your ass, the interval expands.

The Universe is consistent. So if your experience of natural time shows you its variable speed, stretching and contracting, then a place must exist where time goes so quick things happen in an instant.

We know, then, theoretically a place exists where time essentially doesn’t exist. Everything happens at once there. That place can be experienced. But let’s call it theoretical for now.

Good reasons exist for why time functions differently here compared to in nonphysical. But let’s not bother with that. Instead, let’s see now how putting all this theory to work works.

Simultaneous early manifestation

When a person receives a desire, that desire came from someplace. The desire exists before it shows up in the person’s mind. Where it exists is the same place we come from and where time is practically nonexistent: the nonphysical.

So a desire “manifests” first in the mind of a person. That desire wants full expression. Usually desires show up in more than one mind. That way, it enjoys a higher probability of becoming fully expressed. We hear of stories where one creative sues another. The plaintiff claims defendant “stole” a creative’s idea. Sometimes it’s a film idea, or a book concept or a melody, for example.

Usually, the plaintiff gets angry because they didn’t act on the idea, but the defendant one did. Such situations happen because a single idea shows up in many people’s minds at once. But usually only on person will take it to completion.

The minute that desire shows up in the mind, in nonphysical, all resources needed for its full expression, exist. Resources are like desires. They come from the same place desires do. In that place, everything happens instantly. So when a desire exists in nonphysical, so must all resources needed for its full expression.

The minute a desire shows up in the mind, in nonphysical, all resources needed for its full expression, exist. Deliberate creators know their job is to relax and let the desire fulfill itself. (Photo by Vu Thu Giang on Unsplash)

Fertile ground or dead end?

But when a desire shows up in a mind, other thoughts already exist there. These other thoughts create an atmosphere either conducive or detrimental to the desire. That atmosphere will largely determine whether the person receiving the desire acts or not. “Atmosphere” can also be called “momentum”.

Consider a person who believes life is hard, money comes from working for another, people are greedy and “I am not worthy of my dreams.” Such a person isn’t likely to receive a desire inconsistent with what they believe. But let’s say they do. And the desire they get is “create a nonprofit for dogs.”

Don’t you think that person’s immediate reaction to that desire would likely be one of the following?

  • That’s crazy. I can’t do that!
  • Where would I get the money?
  • No one will support that
  • I’m too busy trying to pay my bills
  • I can’t quit my job
  • How would I do that?

These thoughts exist quite comfortably in the atmosphere created by thoughts like “I am not worthy of my dreams,” life is hard, money comes from working for another, people are greedy. So if the desire shows up, odds are it won’t get expressed.

But for the person who understands how dreams are made real, as Peter Gabriel put it in “Mercy Street”, the desire flourishes. That flourish gets aided by time. I’ll cover how in my next post.

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