Here’s Why Avoiding Documentaries Is Really Good Advice

Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash

Documentary films often include an unknown danger for most people, which is why it’s really good advice to not watch so many. Or any at all. Here’s why.

I recently watched a documentary called Human Playground narrated by actor Idris Elba. It’s a series about humanity’s supposed preoccupation with games. Particularly games originating from us needing to survive, fight, kill and endure pain. One episode, for example, explores humans living on the Steppes of Far East Asia. Their sport: game hunting using Golden Eagles.

The same episode follows Amy Palmiero-Winters, the first female amputee to compete in the grueling Marathon des Sables. Marathon Des Sables is a six-day, 156 mile ultramarathon. Rules require runners to carry everything they need with them as they run what essentially is six regular marathons back-to-back. Meanwhile, a camel walks behind the pack of runners. Those the camel overtakes before crossing the finish line are out of the race.

Palmiero-Winters doesn’t win. In fact, she doesn’t finish. Instead, she ends up in a horrible-to-watch fetal grimace as EMTs inject her with fluids. Other aids help with excruciating leg cramps she has even as she screams in pain from the help they offer.

Photo of the first British Runners to complete the Marathon des Sables (Dr Mike Stroud OBE, Rene Nevola, Richard Cooper and Prof Mike Lean). (Photo By Rene Nevola – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0)

Laughing out loud

It’s all great TV. And it would otherwise be harmless entertainment if I didn’t know what I know. The problem with Elba’s documentary, and many such films, is a dangerous overreach reinforcing disempowering beliefs humans spread to one another like a rampant COVID mutation.

For example, less than two minutes into Rites of Passage, the third installment of the series, Elba offers what seems like an innocuous assertion. But the words flowing from his mouth are as powerful, if not more so, as they are seemingly harmless.

The show begins with the camera closing in on a fog-enshrouded village in Madagascar. At village center is a group of brown people. Elba sets up the scene with an ominous VoiceOver.

“Birth,” Elba says. “Is a lottery. We don’t get to choose the culture we’re born into. Which means, we don’t get to choose the games we play either.”

On it’s face, this statement is so ridiculous, I literally laughed out loud when I heard it. But then I thought about millions or tens of millions of people who will hear what he said and unconsciously accept Elba’s words as true.

Elba is a popular entertainment figure. Many love him, and for good reason. The problem accompanying such fame and adoration should be obvious. Just because Elba, or any famous person, merits fame for their talents, doesn’t qualify them on any other subject. But many people take their words as though backed by something substantial just because of their celebrity.

Madagascar is the location for one episode of the documentary Human Playground. (Photo by gemmmm 🖤 on Unsplash)

Mind your thoughts, Luke

Make no mistake, Elba’s talents shine as an actor. Box office receipts substantiate the assertion. When it comes to acting, Elba is an authority.

But Elba and many people like him, including documentarians, don’t understand squat about how reality happens.

The problem lies not only in Elba’s ignorance, but also in the power of suggestion. The power of suggestion is a neutral force. However, that neutrality masks its effectiveness. Few people consciously understand suggestion’s power. By “suggestion” I mean words, thoughts, beliefs, their underlying vibration and that vibration’s electromagnetism.

Humans live literally swimming in a sea of suggestions. It’s why Yoda and other Jedi Masters exhort their padewans be mindful of their thoughts and feelings. Yoda knew thoughts pack a tremendous punch. The unconscious mind will readily accept nearly any suggestion vibrationally matching one’s dominant vibrational momentum.

The vast majority of people don’t understand “thoughts create reality”. So they unwittingly expose themselves to all kinds of disempowering suggestions. Internet memes, ad and election campaign slogans, even “news” messaging come packed with suggestion. Some vehicles deliver relatively harmless suggestions. Others communicate awful suggestions. Some reinforce ideas so disempowering, they disconnect people from their experience as God in human form.

Instead of minding one’s thoughts, as Yoda urges, most people’s subconscious indiscriminately gobbles up all kinds of suggestive messages. And it all happens with the human largely oblivious.

That obliviousness made Fox News and Fox News mirror doppelgänger MSNBC rich and powerful. It’s also causing great misery among many Americans. Americans who turn on one another on political, religious and racial grounds.

Life reflects belief

Elba’s statement above represents suggestions which disconnect people from their Godhood. They’re so innocuous sounding, they go unchecked. Such suggestions go right by conscious awareness and into the subconscious. From there, they create reality.

But Elba’s assertion – made as though it’s fact – is not fact. A simple process of discovery will reveal that we do indeed choose when, where, and every other birth factor. That includes our parents, economic situations and, yes, the culture and games in that culture. Unfortunately for many, this discovery process necessarily takes a while. So few will do it long enough to discover they choose everything they experience.

The results are so convincing, however, it makes Elba’s assertion, and his ignorance, laughable, which is why I laughed when he said what he said.

Elba’s assertion that we come into the world as through a lottery, acts at subtle levels. Once accepted, they generate insecurity in the individual. That insecurity attracts other suggestions with similar electromagnetic properties. People unwittingly then create lives filled with random, risky and unfavorable situations. Other people are seen as scary and threatening, especially those who look or think differently.

If a person believes life is random, by definition, one has no control over life. That makes life a risky, scary proposition. People immersed in such insecurity often deny their insecurity. But a life filled with “ups and downs”, or mostly downs, comes from unwittingly accepting such disempowering suggestions as “Birth is a lottery.”

Of course all beliefs prove true if believed long enough. Then, the person will defend their beliefs as true. Even when those beliefs create extremely painful, miserable, dangerous and frightening life experiences.

Most documentaries fill our heads with unhealthy suggestions. Which is why I watch hardly any. (Photo by Chandler Media on Unsplash)

Most documentaries aren’t worth watching

A lot of documentaries become successful based on the enraging nature of their content. Often, the more enraging the content, the more popular the documentary gets. And it’s those very documentaries we all might want to consider avoiding like the plague.

I don’t use the world “plague” lightly. For just like a plague, such documentaries spread like viruses. They infect us with negative suggestions while rarely offering solutions to problems they present. Yes, some win acclaim. Their makers gain massive fame, fortunes and awards. Some create momentum which changes culture for the better.

But at what fundamental price? Many documentaries present problems so great no single person can do anything about them.

Then there are documentaries like Elba’s Human Playground. Seemingly innocuous shows about humanity which amplify common, yet no less disempowering, suggestions. After watching the first installment, I felt something amiss. After the first few minutes of the third installment I shut it off. I’m not planning to watch any more.

I prefer minding my thoughts, allowing only suggestions in which support the reality I want. Admittedly, such attention requires diligence. But extraordinary, deliberate living, the Charmed Life I write about, demands such fine-tuned attention.

We live in a sea of suggestions. I’m committed to selecting from among that sea only suggestions adding to my joy. Suggestions amplifying my knowing that I am the creator of my reality. Which is why I avoid pretty much all documentaries. You should as well.

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