Hard work is common but unnecessary

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We’ve been told to work hard. But the very successful don’t become successful through hard work. Even though they too fall into this mythical power of “working hard.”

Work-hard believers point to people like Michael Jordan, Ray Kroc, Thomas Edison and the like, as people who worked hard to get their rewards.

But all of these people, including other very successful people aren’t working very hard. What they are doing is doing the thing that lights their fire.

That’s what keeps a person willing to work all day and night. They aren’t doing that because they want the end goal. They are focused in the now, engaged in a seeming unlimited source of energy born of the connection with their passion and their focus.

In that, they find the delicious experience of flow.

Combat soldiers in the heat of battle get the same experience. They are so focused in the now, their reflexes, attention and abilities are heightened. And they can continue that way for long periods.

This connection is nothing more than the feeling one gets when the human being and its “larger self” are in direct communication. Whether you’re shooting hoops, planning and executing on a business strategy, exploring the limits of electricity, or trying to stay alive when others are trying to kill you, the connection and the indicator of that connection are the same: an intoxicating feeling of aliveness.

But you don’t have to go to Fallujah, create a massive company, or invent a new technology to have this experience. This experience is available to all. And no matter what happens when one’s alive, everyone gets it after death.

But you don’t have to wait to die to have it either.

The great thing is, tapping into it now, while you’re still alive, creates a life experience unparalleled by anything else.

And it’s guaranteed that if you can relax into it, and soothe your indoctrination that hard work is the key to success, you get all you want.

Hard work: unnecessary.

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